New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study

The New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study was launched in 2022 to improve understanding of how life events and stress affect health, particularly within historically disadvantaged groups, multigenerational families, and immigrant groups. The overarching goal of the study is to offer practical, actionable information for improving population health, well-being and health equity in New Jersey and beyond.


Call or text 888-676-0555 or email NJCohort@ifh.rutgers.edu

What is NJCOHORT?

New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study

The Cohort study will represent New Jersey residents ages 14 and older, and will include large groups of immigrants, people in multi-generational households and minority and low-income residents. Existing data does not provide information by immigrant subgroups for understanding population specific social and cultural determinants of health. To fill the gaps in the existing data sources, the Cohort study aims to collect data over time to understand community needs, stressors, strengths and how they impact health. Findings will offer practical, actionable information for improving population health and health equity.

Participants will be asked to take part in an in-depth in person or telephone interview. Some participants will be asked to submit blood samples/biomarkers and physical activity data. We will also request permission to link your information with other data sources.

Booking

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Each participant can earn up to $105!

How did you learn about this study?

New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study - Teaser Video

This study is conducted under the direction of Dr. Joel Cantor, Distinguished Professor, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University. His office is located at 112 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ. Funding for this study is provided by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Rutgers University.